Tag: Science

exPLAINers of the Week July 30 – Aug 5

By Perfectly Plain Staff

This week we have stopped on two great pieces. The first is Nathaniel Rich’s look at how we almost stopped climate change in the 1980s. The second is Michael Krepon’s look at nuclear weapons in wake of the 73rd anniversary of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima.

exPLAINers of the week: July 23-July 29

By Perfectly Plain Staff

This weeks exPLAINers examine the ethical problems with gene replacement therapy and a detailed map of the 2016 presidential election voting across the U.S.

Violent crime is like infectious disease – and we know how to stop it spreadin

By Samira Shackle

Headlines scream about “epidemics” of shootings and stabbings – but what if we took that literally? From Chicago to Glasgow, treating violence as a public health problem has produced great results.

Five Resources We Are Running Out Of And Their Alternatives

By Pawan Naidu

For every resource that is running out due to human consumption, there is an alternative that can serve the same purpose. Let’s take a look at the five resources in danger of extinction and their alternatives.

The 10 Highest Paid Degrees

By Pawan Naidu

While a bachelor’s degree isn’t the only avenue to obtain a job that gives us financial independence, it is a path that many teenagers and parents feel is an investment to transition into adulthood. However, when it comes to money, not all degrees are built the same. Your major largely determines your earning potential, and Payscale recently ranked majors based on alumni salaries.

Photo by: Pixabay

There Might Be More to Gravity Than We Thought

By Pawan Naidu

This first detection of gravitational waves was the culmination of an epic scientific quest that resulted in proving Albert Einstein’s landmark theory of gravity. Since then, detectors have seen them multiple times. However, this is only the beginning.

Photo by Sweet Ice Cream Photography on Unsplash

Anyone else out there?

By Teodor Teofilov

Unimaginable vastness and size; that is our Universe. Its ever-expanding nature is filled with a nearly infinite supply of potential life-giving planets and moons leaves us with one question: Are we alone in the Universe?

You don’t have a right to believe whatever you want to

By Daniel DeNicola

Do we have the right to believe whatever we want to believe? This supposed right is often claimed as the last resort of the wilfully ignorant, the person who is cornered by evidence and mounting opinion: ‘I believe climate change is a hoax whatever anyone else says, and I have a right to believe it!’ But is there such a right?

Fall of Facts

By Teodor Teofilov

When democracy is in crisis, we look for truth in facts. However, they are losing their ability to unite us around a consensus.

Our Universe is too vast for even the most imaginative sci-fi

By Michael Strauss

As an astrophysicist, I am always struck by the fact that even the wildest science-fiction stories tend to be distinctly human in character. No matter how exotic the locale or how unusual the scientific concepts, most science fiction ends up being about quintessentially human (or human-like) interactions, problems, foibles and challenges